Blogs

Published 1/20/2021

POWELL & WITTENBERG: Tullahoma (2020)

By: Fred L. Johnson III Category: Book Reviews

The diligent, robust scholarship found on the pages of David A. Powell and Eric J. Wittenberg's "Tullahoma" has expanded the historiography and helped to further balance perspectives on the relative importance of the Western Theater.

Published 1/13/2021

SMITH: The Thin Gray Line (2019)

By: Sarah Kay Bierle Category: Book Reviews

Michael Smith's "The Thin Gray Line" offers a new look at the darker side of the war.

Published 1/6/2021

CURRAN: Women Making War (2020)

By: Heather Carlquist Walser Category: Book Reviews

Readers and scholars with wide-ranging interests will find Thomas F. Curran's "Women Making War" useful and fascinating.

Published 12/30/2020

SADLER: Absalom Hazlett (2020)

By: Codie Eash Category: Book Reviews

In "Absalom Hazlett," Spencer Sadler has unearthed and conveyed a valuable story about a captivating and overlooked subject.

Published 12/28/2020

Goodbye to All That

By: Mark Grimsley Category: American Iliad

A southerner finds clarity in a tangle of loyalties ...

Published 12/23/2020

CHATELAIN: Defending the Arteries of Rebellion (2020)

By: J. Ross Dancy Category: Book Reviews

Comprehensive is perhaps the best adjective to describe Neil P. Chatelain's "Defending the Arteries of Rebellion."

Published 12/21/2020

Extra Voices: Coffee

By: The Civil War Monitor Category: Articles

In the Voices section of the Winter 2020 issue of The Civil War Monitor we highlighted quotes by Union and Confederate soldiers about the importance of coffee to the troops. Unfortunately, we didn't have room to include all that we found. Below are those that didn't make the cut.

Published 12/16/2020

McDONOUGH: William Tecumseh Sherman (2016)

By: Mitchell G. Klingenberg Category: Book Reviews

James Lee McDonough's "William Tecumseh Sherman" is a capable and often moving biography of a worthy subject.

Published 12/9/2020

ZVENGROWSKI: Jefferson Davis, Napoleonic France, and the Nature of Confederate Ideology (2020)

By: Caleb W. Southern Category: Book Reviews

Internal division within the Confederacy, Jeffrey Zvengrowski claims, had less to do with class and more to do with politics...

Published 12/7/2020

The Best Civil War Books of 2020

By: The Civil War Monitor Category: Articles

With the help of a handful of Civil War historians and enthusiasts, here is our list of the best Civil War books of 2020.

Published 12/2/2020

HESS: Storming Vicksburg (2020)

By: Robert Glaze Category: Book Reviews

Earl Hess' "Storming Vicksburg" is an effective battle history that moves beyond strategy and tactics to embrace the broader mosaic of the Civil War military experience.

Published 11/25/2020

GOTTFRIED: The Maps of the Cavalry in the Gettysburg Campaign (2020)

By: Jonathan Noyalas Category: Book Reviews

"The Maps of the Cavalry in the Gettysburg Campaign" makes excellent use of primary accounts penned by Union and Confederate cavalrymen....

Published 11/18/2020

FUOSS: Soldiers National Cemetery at Gettysburg (2020)

By: Rory Cornish Category: Book Reviews

Jarrad Fuoss has made a useful contribution to understanding the symbolism of the "Soldiers National Cemetery at Gettysburg" and its place in American memory.

Published 11/17/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 7

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, The Good Lord Bird, a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the award-winning novel of the same name by James McBride—premiered on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs. 

Published 11/11/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 6

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, The Good Lord Bird, a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the award-winning novel of the same name by James McBride—premiered on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs. 

Published 11/11/2020

TAYLOR: Fighting for Citizenship (2020)

By: Robert Colby Category: Book Reviews

Brian Taylor's "Fighting for Citizenship" gives nuance to a debate that is all too often limited to an invocation of the famous 'Men of Color! To Arms' poster...

Published 11/4/2020

TAYLOR (ed.): My Dear Nelly (2020)

By: George C. Rable Category: Book Reviews

"My Dear Nelly" reveals Orlando Poe to be a man of both ability and no little ego, but one who struggled for distinction in the field and for control over affairs at home.

Published 11/3/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 5

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, The Good Lord Bird, a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the award-winning novel of the same name by James McBride—premiered on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs. 

Published 10/28/2020

BUTLER: Unforgiven (2021)

By: Codie Eash Category: Book Reviews

"Unforgiven" presents a unique, tense, and absorbing twist on an unprecedented moment in U.S. Civil War and judicial history.

Published 10/27/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 4

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, The Good Lord Bird, a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the award-winning novel of the same name by James McBride—premiered on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs.