Blogs

Published 9/22/2021

HOLDEN: Surviving Southampton (2021)

By: Benjamin E. Park Category: Book Reviews

Vanessa M. Holden's "Surviving Southampton" moves our attention from Nat Turner to his community at a time when the appeal for uncovering societies of resistance has never been more apparent.

Published 9/20/2021

Unceasing Fury at Chickamauga

By: W.W. Heartsill Category: In the First Person

The Battle of Chickamauga, fought on September 18–20, 1863, pitted the William Rosecrans Army of the Cumberland against Braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee in the war's first major land battle in Georgia. The bloody fighting, a resounding Confederate victory that produced some 34,000 total causalties, was marked by a series of Rebel attacks: on the 18th, James Longstreet's corps exploited a gap...

Published 9/15/2021

STEINER: Lincoln and Citizenship (2021)

By: Paul Quigley Category: Book Reviews

"Lincoln and Citizenship" is a terrific addition to the Concise Lincoln Library series from Southern Illinois University Press.

Published 9/13/2021

Extra Voices: Nicknames

By: The Civil War Monitor Category: Articles

In the Voices section of the Fall 2021 issue of The Civil War Monitor we highlighted quotes by Union and Confederate soldiers about nicknames. Unfortunately, we didn't have room to include all that we found. Below are those that just missed the cut.

Published 9/8/2021

REEVES: A Fire in the Wilderness (2021)

By: Jeffry D. Wert Category: Book Reviews

John Reeves' "A Fire in the Wilderness" captures well the horrors of the combat.

Published 9/1/2021

BYRD: A Holy Baptism of Fire & Blood (2021)

By: Caleb W. Southern Category: Book Reviews

James P. Byrd's "A Holy Baptism of Fire & Blood" raises important questions about the Bible's place in the Civil War era.

Published 8/27/2021

Voices From the Army of Northern Virginia, Part 2

By: Gary W. Gallagher Category: Articles

Artillerists created an invaluable body of evidence relating to the Army of Northern Virginia. Though they made up only about 7.5 percent of the army’s strength, they figured prominently in almost every battle and decisively in a few.

Published 8/25/2021

HUGHES: Unlike Anything That Ever Floated (2021)

By: J. Ross Dancy Category: Book Reviews

Dwight Hughes' "Unlike Anything That Ever Floated" supplies an engaging narrative that is not short on technical detail.

Published 8/18/2021

GOSSE: The First Reconstruction (2021)

By: Lucien Holness Category: Book Reviews

Van Gosse's "The First Reconstruction" is an important work that provides a new interpretation of the politics of the early republic.

Published 8/11/2021

STANLEY: Grand Army of Labor (2021)

By: David A. Zonderman Category: Book Reviews

Matthew E. Stanley's "Grand Army of Labor" explores how the war's echoes both strengthened and constrained the labor movement.

Published 8/4/2021

DRETSKE: The Bonds of War (2021)

By: Damian Shiels Category: Book Reviews

"The Bonds of War" represents a significant addition to the literature on immigrants in United States service....

Published 7/28/2021

WYNSTRA: No Place for Glory (2021)

By: Robert L. Glaze Category: Book Reviews

With "No Place for Glory," Robert Wynstra has established himself as one of the Gettysburg Campaign's most capable modern scholars.

Published 7/21/2021

WAITE: West of Slavery (2021)

By: Cecily N. Zander Category: Book Reviews

"West of Slavery" by Kevin Waite weaves together the stories of the South and the West to tell a continental narrative of political ambition, economic striving, and social transformation in the Civil War era.

Published 7/20/2021

After Fort Wagner

By: Lewis Douglass Category: In the First Person

On July 20, 1863, Lewis Douglass, 22, a member of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry—and son of famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass—wrote the following letter to H. Amelia Loguen of Syracuse, New York. The previous evening, Douglass and the 54th had participated in the failed Union attack on Fort Wagner on Morris Island, South Carolina. He would have written this letter only hours after battlle...

Published 7/18/2021

The 54th Massachusetts at Fort Wagner

By: The Civil War Monitor Category: Photo Essays

On July 18, 1863, Union troops commanded by Brigadier General Quincy Gillmore launched an attack on Fort Wagner, the Confederate bastion that protected Morris Island, located south of Charleston Harbor—part of the larger Federal attempt to capture the city of Charleston. While the assault failed, the men of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry, the African-Americann regiment commanded by Colonel ...

Published 7/16/2021

Bully Boys

By: Tracy L. Barnett Category: Articles

How a word with rough origins came to represent good times to the troops.

Published 7/14/2021

TRAMMELL & TERRELL: Civil War Richmond (2021)

By: Codie Eash Category: Book Reviews

Jack Trammell and Guy Terrell's "Civil War Richmond" is the latest in a recent spate of monographs, essay collections, and guidebooks pertaining to the city.

Published 7/7/2021

STAHL & BORDERS: Faces of Union Soldiers at South Mountain & Harpers Ferry (2021)

By: Eugene D. Schmiel Category: Book Reviews

Joseph Stahl and Matthew Borders' "Faces of Union Soldiers at South Mountain & Harpers Ferry" achieves very well its objective of personalizing and picturing, literally, the reality of the Civil War for the common soldier during the critical Maryland campaign of 1862.

Published 6/30/2021

BIELSKI: A Mortal Blow to the Confederacy (2021)

By: Riley Sullivan Category: Book Reviews

Mark F. Bielksi's "A Mortal Blow to the Confederacy" engages debates about where the Civil War was won and lost.