Blog

Published 10/12/2011

MARTEN: Sing Not War (2011)

By: Brian M. Jordan Category: Book Reviews

More so than any previous historian, Marten sheds light on several important questions: how did veterans live, and how were they perceived by society? Sing Not War has given admirable shape and definition to an anemic subfield of Civil War history, and as such it is a welcome addition to the literature. Future studies of the war’s consequences must contend with the important questions that James ...

Published 10/12/2011

MCCURRY: Confederate Reckoning (2010)

By: David K. Thomson Category: Book Reviews

Confederate Reckoning’s sharp narrative and fresh analysis of the odds faced by slaveholders in the Confederacy and their contributions to its internal collapse is both timely and justified as historians try to reassess key issues of race and gender, such as the roles of southern women and slaves, in relation to the war. McCurry has opened the door for future scholarship and has further cemented...

Published 10/11/2011

D. W. Griffith's Other Civil War Movie

By: Andy Hall Category: Commentary

The infamous director's 1930 biography of Lincoln was one of only two "talkies" made by Griffith, and stars Walter Huston in the title role. The screenplay is by Stephen Vincent Benet, who the year previous had won the Pulitzer Prize for his book-length poem, John Brown's Body. The film is the earliest feature-length film on Lincoln.

Published 10/10/2011

Voices from the Past: A "Plucky" Young Soldier

By: Terry Johnston Category: Quotables

Good morning! The Civil War Monitor has added a new section to The Front Line: Quotables. Each Monday, we will share a Voice from Past to help you learn more about the Civil War...from the men and women who actually lived it.

Published 10/5/2011

BERRY (ed.): Weirding the War: Stories from the Civil War's Ragged Edges (2011)

By: W. Fitzhugh Brundage Category: Book Reviews

The essays themselves explore nooks and crevices of Civil War history that are always interesting, sometimes poignant, and often revelatory. Berry’s introduction is especially cogent about the thread that runs through the collection: the “littleness” of the war. Almost certainly this view of the conflict is rooted in the experience of contemporary Americans with war. We have a half century of...

Published 10/4/2011

"It made us an 'is'."

By: Andy Hall Category: Analysis

It's one of the great quotes, from one of the great documentaries, that sums up the legacy of the American Civil War:

Published 9/29/2011

A War of Words

By: Amy Murrell Taylor Category: Analysis

There’s a lot that remains unsettled about the Civil War: “Manassas” or “Bull Run”? “Civil War” or “War Between the States”? Forget the big questions about what the war was about: we cannot even agree on something as simple as what words to use to describe what actually happened between 1861 and 1865. It’s the sort of disagreement that isn’t going away anytime soon, because...

Published 9/28/2011

GOODHEART: 1861: The Civil War Awakening (2011)

By: A. Wilson Greene Category: Book Reviews

Adam Goodheart�s much heralded 1861: The Civil War Awakening is an eloquent, innovative, and deeply researched collection of chapter-length vignettes that surveys a variety of events at the outset of our national bloodletting...