Blog

Published 8/21/2019

TACKACH: Lincoln and the Natural Environment (2019)

By: Brian Matthew Jordan Category: Book Reviews

When Lincoln spoke about 'binding up the nation's wounds,' he almost certainly counted the landscape among them.

Published 8/19/2019

Winslow Homer's Civil War

By: The Civil War Monitor Category: Photo Essays

After the outbreak of the Civil War, 25-year-old artist Winslow Homer traveled to the front to sketch scenes of the conflict's participants and engagements for Harper's Weekly, the country's premier illustrated newspaper. Though young, Homer, who had sketched for Harper's for years before the start of hostilities, had already established himself as a skilled illustrator with a keen eye for...

Published 8/14/2019

Mutiny in the Army

By: William Thompson Lusk Category: In the First Person

On August 14, 1861, the sense of anger and disgruntlement that had been building among the men of the largely Scottish-American 79th New York Infantry "Highlanders" boiled over. The rank and file of the regiment, which had suffered one of the highest number of casualties among Union units engaged in the recent Battle of Bull Run (including the death of their colonel, James Cameron, brother to the...

Published 8/14/2019

SILKENAT: Raising the White Flag (2019)

By: Eric Michael Burke Category: Book Reviews

If surrender never quite 'defined' the war, this book makes clear that it unquestionably suffused it.

Published 8/12/2019

The B&A Q&A: Kevin M. Levin

By: The Civil War Monitor Category: The Bookshelf

In his latest book, "Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth" (to be published this fall by the University of North Carolina Press), Boston-based historian and educator Kevin M. Levin tackles the enduring

Published 8/7/2019

BIERLE: Call Out the Cadets (2019)

By: Jonathan Noyalas Category: Book Reviews

Bierle never loses sight of the fact that the battle did not occur in some remote hinterland, but rather in a larger community.

Published 7/31/2019

ELDER: That Bloody Hill (2017)

By: William Lee White Category: Book Reviews

Chickamauga was a grim first outing for the Alabamians.

Published 7/26/2019

History as Imagination

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Stereoscope

Anyone who has spent considerable time in research libraries or logging onto digital archives knows what it feels like to come to the end of an evidentiary road. A promising file of letters reveals huge gaps in the writers’ correspondence. A tantalizing detail in a census record leads nowhere. A diary entry ends with a page torn out. Historians must make what they can of such incomplete evidence...