Blogs

Published 11/7/2011

Voices from the Past: "Sagacious Military Conjecture"

By: Laura June Davis Category: From the Archives

Wilder Dwight was a Lieutenant Colonel inthe 2nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. Prior to dying September 19, 1862 from wounds at the Battle of Antietam, Dwight wrote some conjectures about the events at the Battle of Port Royal.

Published 11/7/2011

The Confederate Perspective: "Port Royal...has been taken by the enemy's fleet"

By: Laura June Davis Category: Quotables

— From the 9 November 1861 entry of John Beauchamp Jones Diary—

Published 11/7/2011

Voices from the Past: "The Glorious News from Port Royal"

By: Laura June Davis Category: From the Archives

After the Union victory at Port Royal, Major General George Brinton McClellan wrote the following letter to his wife, Mary Ellen Marcy McClellan.

Published 11/7/2011

Voices from the Past: "A Slow Affair"

By: Laura June Davis Category: From the Archives

William Thompson Lusk (May 23, 1838 – June 12, 1897) was an American obstetrician, who left medical school to join the Union Army. Lusk participated in the Battle of Port Royal and wrote about his experiences. Unusually, Lusk did not vilify the Southern soldiers he encountered; he seemed to regard the Southerners highly, often criticizing the "Yankee hordes" who invaded the Southerners' ...

Published 11/7/2011

Voices from the Past: "The Gratifying Duty"

By: Laura June Davis Category: From the Archives

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Port Royal—one of the earliest amphibious operations of the American Civil War. The United States Navy fleet and the United States Army expeditionary force worked together captured Port Royal Sound, South Carolina, including Fort Walker on Hilton Head Island and Fort Beauregard on Phillip's Island. The following is Union Flag Officer Samuel Du ...

Published 11/4/2011

Image of the Day: The Dogs of War

By: Terry Johnston Category: From the Archives

From Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, "An Incident of Battle — A Faithful Dog Watching the Dead Body of His Master" ...

Published 11/3/2011

Sarah Morgan's Arrival in Yankee-Occupied New Orleans

By: Terry Johnston Category: From the Archives

In April 1863, 21-year-old Sarah Morgan, along with her mother and sisters, found herself on a ship headed for the city of her birth, New Orleans. The Morgan familiy had lived in Baton Rouge for years, but after Union forces took the town the previous August, they abondoned their home...

Published 11/2/2011

MARTIN: General Braxton Bragg, C.S.A. (2011)

By: Jeffry D Wert Category: Book Reviews

In this lengthy and well-researched new biography of Bragg, Samuel Martin attempts to rectify the Confederate general’s historical record and reputation. It is a commendable effort by the veteran author that will assuredly stir further debate and controversy...

Published 10/31/2011

Voices from the Past - Out of That Silence Rose New Sounds More Appalling Still

By: Laura June Davis Category: Quotables

The Battle of Fredericksburg (December 11-15, 1862) was a decisive loss for the Union Army, crippling Northern morale. The chilling quote below derives from Lieutenant Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain's description of the battle's aftermath

Published 10/31/2011

Voices From the Past: "I am truly thankful for the institution of ghosts..."

By: Civil War Monitor Category: Quotables

"You perceive that my idea of ghosts is not limited to graveyards and tombs, or the tenants thereof; indeed, so far from it..."

Published 10/31/2011

"They See a Ghost or Something."

By: Terry Johnston Category: From the Archives

On May 25, 1863, Union soldier David L. Day, of the 25th Massachusetts Volunteers, recorded a strange incident that occurred while his regiment was on a recent nighttime march:

Published 10/31/2011

Mrs. ("Beast") Butler's Scary Dream

By: Terry Johnston Category: From the Archives

On April 4, 1862, Sarah Hildreth Butler, wife of Union general Benjamin F. ("Beast") Butler, wrote a friend to document her recent activities on Ship Island, off the Mississippi Gulf Coast, which Union troops commanded by her husband had occupied since the previous December. As she notes, a recent storm made for a particulary spooky night:

Published 10/28/2011

Are You Ready for Some (Civil War) Football?

By: Terry Johnston Category: From the Archives

Winslow Homer's depiction of Union soldiers playing "Foot-Ball" in camp. Looks harmless enough...

Published 10/27/2011

Teaching Slavery as the Cause of the Civil War

By: Andrew L. Slap Category: Commentary

“What caused the Civil War?” Historians have killed forests trying to answer this deceptively simple question. In a recent essay in The Journal of the Civil War Era, Frank Towers discusses changing interpretations over the last 150 years, finding that starting in the 1960s historians “foregrounded slavery as the war’s cause, situated within a global process of modernization.” And while...

Published 10/26/2011

THOMAS: The Iron Way (2011)

By: Elizabeth Varon Category: Book Reviews

William G. Thomas’s The Iron Way is a tour-de-force, and offers a series of bracing insights about the origins, shape and outcome of the Civil War. Thomas argues that the railroads were sites and symbols of contested modernity in antebellum America. They did not simply symbolize northern industrial might and progress, but also the South’s determination to have modernity on its own terms: to...

Published 10/26/2011

GLATTHAAR: Soldiering in the Army of Northern Virginia (2011)

By: Brian Craig Miller Category: Book Reviews

Designed as a companion to his superb 2008 work General Lee’s Army: From Victory to Collapse, the statistical volume breaks down the sample of six hundred soldiers that Glatthaar used to tell the story of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia...

Published 10/25/2011

Respect My Heritage; You Can Stick Yours

By: Andy Hall Category: Commentary

Several news stories appeared in the media recently updating recent developments in a neighborhood dispute in South Carolina that’s been brewing for about year now. The brief recap is that a white woman, Annie Chambers Caddell, moved into the historically African American neighborhood of Brownsville, an formerly-unincorporated area now part of the city of Summerville.

Published 10/24/2011

Voices From the Past: "An Inferior Force"

By: Civil War Monitor Category: Quotables

“Well, so far we seem to have applied a new maxim of war, always to meet the enemy with an inferior force at the point of attack.”

Published 10/21/2011

Ball's Bluff Remembered

By: Terry Johnston Category: From the Archives

One hundred fifty years ago today, on October 21, 1861, Union troops suffered a humiliating defeat in what would come to be known as the Battle of Ball's Bluff. After crossing the Potomac River to conduct a reconnaissance in the vicinity of Leesburg, Virginia, a small Union force was routed by the opposing Confederates, who drove the survivors back down the steep banks of the Potomac and...

Published 10/20/2011

Progress and Change and Preservation

By: Civil War Monitor Category: Commentary

We often hear a good location is critical in many business pursuits, particularly in retail. Yet for those who study Civil War battles, the battlefield IS the location...