Blog

Published 11/17/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 7

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, The Good Lord Bird, a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the award-winning novel of the same name by James McBride—premiered on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs. 

Published 11/11/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 6

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, The Good Lord Bird, a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the award-winning novel of the same name by James McBride—premiered on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs. 

Published 11/3/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 5

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, The Good Lord Bird, a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the award-winning novel of the same name by James McBride—premiered on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs. 

Published 10/27/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 4

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, The Good Lord Bird, a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the award-winning novel of the same name by James McBride—premiered on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs. 

Published 10/20/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 3

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, The Good Lord Bird, a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the award-winning novel of the same name by James McBride—premiered on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs. 

Published 10/13/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 2

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, The Good Lord Bird, a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the award-winning novel of the same name by James McBride—premiered on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs. 

Published 10/6/2020

"The Good Lord Bird": Episode 1

By: Megan Kate Nelson Category: Analysis

On October 4, 2020, "The Good Lord Bird," a 7-part miniseries about the life of abolitionist John Brown—based on the novel of the same name by James McBride—premeried on Showtime. We enlisted historian Megan Kate Nelson to watch and review the series, episode by episode. We'll publish her takes below, as each episode airs. 

Published 6/12/2020

History’s "Grant" Considered

By: Brooks D. Simpson Category: Analysis

Ulysses S. Grant scholar Brooks D. Simpson reviews History Channel's recent series, "Grant."

Published 7/2/2018

The Best Gettysburg Books

By: The Civil War Monitor Category: Analysis

What are the five best books about the Battle of Gettysburg (nonfiction or fiction)? We asked six Civil War historians for their answers.

Published 11/10/2017

The Best Civil War Books of All Time

By: The Civil War Monitor Category: Analysis

What are the best Civil War books ever published? We asked a panel of Civil War historians—J. Matthew Gallman, Matthew C. Hulbert, James Marten, and Amy Murrell Taylor—for their picks.

Published 11/3/2017

Then and Now: How Civil War-Era Doctors Responded to Their Own Opiate Epidemic

By: Jonathan S. Jones Category: Analysis

Hidden among the many headlines about the United States' ongoing opioid crisis was an important press release issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) earlier this summer. On Thursday, June 8, the FDA requested that drug manufacturer Endo Pharmaceuticals pull the opioid Opana ER from the market. Opana is notorious for its extraordinary power and addictiveness—even compared to other...

Published 9/15/2016

Extra Dossier: Stonewall Jackson

By: Civil War Monitor Category: Analysis

For the Dossier section of the fall 2016 issue of The Civil War Monitor, we asked a panel of 20 Civil War historians a series of questions about Confederate general Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, from what they most admired about the famed commander to their favorite book about him. Due to space constraints, we weren't able to include any of the answers to our final question for the panel, "If ...

Published 5/26/2014

The First Civil War Monument

By: Jonathan W. White Category: Analysis

In 1861, the town of Hatboro, Pennsylvania, dedicated a monument to the soldiers of the Revolutionary War while acknowledging the patriotism of Union troops engaged in a new conflict.

Published 5/5/2014

What Should Historians Make of "Black Confederates?"

By: Glenn Brasher Category: Analysis

The stories on which Confederate apologists draw to verify the existence of "Black Confederates" were created by northern emancipationists for a very different goal.

Published 10/8/2012

The Myth of the H.L. Hunley's Blue Lantern

By: Christopher D. Rucker, MD Category: Analysis

It has long been said that, after sinking the USS Housatonic on the evening of February 17, 1864, the crew of the Confederate submarine Hunley used a "blue light" to signal their success to shore. In truth, the blue lantern is a modern myth, born of ignorance of a lost technology.

Published 10/1/2012

The Consequences of Damning the Torpedoes

By: John Grady Category: Analysis

When Lieutenant Commander William H. Gamble reported that he had moved out of the way of an ironclad and was about to drop anchor, "a torpedo exploded under the bow, and the vessel immediately commenced sinking." He reported two sailors were killed in the explosion, was unsure about how many were wounded below deck but confirmed three sailors were wounded on deck. "The wounded were conveyed to the...

Published 8/27/2012

Bowdoin's Other Civil War Sons

By: David Thomson Category: Analysis

Discussions surrounding Bowdoin College and the Civil War invariably return to Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the 20th Maine. But another brotherly duo at Bowdoin is even more important to our understanding of the War: Oliver Otis and Charles Howard.

Published 8/6/2012

John Sherman and the Would-Be Thirteenth Amendment of 1861

By: Dan Crofts Category: Analysis

Four years before Congress passed the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery, Republican John Sherman of Ohio argued the merits of a very different Thirteenth Amendment, one that would do the exact opposite.

Published 7/30/2012

Munson Monroe Buford's Unfinished Civil War

By: James Broomall Category: Analysis

Munson Monroe Buford's Civil War did not end at Durham Station, North Carolina, in the spring of 1865 but instead continued, in varied forms, for the remainder of his life.

Published 7/23/2012

Fantasizing Lee as a Civil Rights Pioneer

By: Andy Hall Category: Analysis

There's a tale widely told these days about how Robert E. Lee, soon after the war, reached out in Christian fellowship to a black worshiper at Richmond's St. Paul's Episcopal Church. But that's not what the witness saw at the time.